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Friday, October 2, 2015

How to Measure Over-draperies

How to Measure Over-draperies 
Length of draperies depends, like that of glass curtains, on the style of window treatment and the type of window you have. Very formal draperies call for a drape of 6 to 12 inches along the floor, whereas less formal draperies should just escape the floor. A word of caution: if you live in a sooty city where cleaning is a matter of constant vigilance, avoid the more formal draperies, which may act as dirt catchers, and remember that there is nothing elegant about a dirty drapery dragging along the floor. Also if you have very young children, this type of drapery is apt to prove a menace. Draperies may also be sill length, particularly in recessed windows, or may come to the bottom of the window apron. In measuring the length make the following allowances: 1 inch for the rod; 2 or 3 inches for the heading or stiffened pinch-pleated top, if you are not counting on a swag or valance; 3 inches for the top hem to turn under the linings or buckram; 3/4 inches for the bottom hem, or if you plan to add trim, % inch for the bottom hem.

The average drapery fabric usually comes 36 and 50 inches wide, and you will not usually want to split this width. Use one width for each side of the average window. The drapery should conceal the frame of the window. The width is always at least twice the completed width to allow for pleats and drapery effects.

How to Measure Over-draperies 
If you are using the curtain-wall idea with the draperies going clear across the room, you will want to measure the entire length of the wall, and your height should be from just below the ceiling moulding.

With figured fabrics it is necessary to allow for repeats of patterns. These must be counted and arranged to come exactly opposite one another on the same line for every piece of drapery in the room. This may require about 20 inches of additional material, according to the size of the design.

Measuring Linings

Linings are 4 to 5 inches narrower than draperies, and 6 inches shorter. The lining is attached below the top hem. If you plan an interlining buy this 3 to 6 inches shorter than the lining. The lining should come out the exact measurement of the draperies when completed.

Measuring for Valances

When you are planning your windows as a unit, you will plan to buy your valance or swag material at the same time as your curtain or drapery fabric, especially if you are going to use the same material.

How to Measure Over-draperies 
In figuring how much yardage to get for a valance, plan on a depth of at least 12 inches for a shirred valance or one with a flounce. To this add 2 inches for the bottom hem, plus 2 inches for the turn around the rod, plus 2 inches for the heading above the rod. If you are using a shaped valance, plan on about 15 inches of depth, although there are no hard and fast rules on this, as the length of your window and your wall should be taken into consideration. But as the valance will tend to reduce the light afforded by the window and will make the window seem smaller, bear in mind the ruling that the valance should not take up more than one-eighth of your curtain length.

It is generally agreed that the fuller a pleated valance looks the more attractive it is, so to have a starchy, dainty valance measure twice double your width; in fact for a full pleat or a box pleat try 2% to 3 times the width.

Measuring for a swag is easy if you follow this formula: take the length of your window from top frame to floor, add the width of the window, and the length of the other side from top of frame to window sill.

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